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Current Edition

December 2016

Volume 2 Issue 1

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Research Article

Does Preoperative Physiotherapy Increase the Rate of Same Day Discharge in First Ray Surgery?

Alexander W Glover*, M Hicks, A Doorgakant, S Srinivas, J Sanchez-Ballester

Recent department of health guidelines recommend that bunion surgery should be performed as a day case to reduce hospital costs and improve patient outcomes. Following an audit between 2012 and 2013, we noted a significant proportion of patients undergoing first ray surgery were being admitted following surgery, often for 24 hours or even longer. Preoperative physiotherapy has been shown to decrease length of stay in such procedures. We therefore implemented a preoperative physiotherapy ‘foot school’ to address this. In this paper we reaudit the rates of same day discharge in first ray surgery to assess its efficacy.

 

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Case Report

A Case of Trigger Finger Caused by A Bony Prominence of The Second Metacarpal Head

Morimitsu Takai, MD*, Denju Osada, MD, Masahiro Kameda, MD, Michiyo Tomaru, MD, Kazuya Tamai, MD, Hiroshi Taneichi, MD

Locking of the metacarpophalangeal (MP) joint due to the presence of a spur or bony prominence of the metacarpal head has been frequently reported. We herein report a rare case of trigger finger caused by a bony prominence of the second metacarpal head. A 15-year-old female had been aware of triggering of the right index finger at the time of extension for approximately three years. On an examination, triggering with crepitation was detected around the MP joint when the patient extended the index finger from the flexed position, and complete extension was enabled after triggering.

 

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Original Research

Tarsal Navicular Stress Fracture - A Challenging Injury in Athletes

Esa Liimatainen, Olli J. Heinonen, Lasse Lempaninen*, Kristian Johansson, Janne Sarimo, David Lopez, Sakari Orava

Stress fractures in the lower extremities are common, especially in athletes and military recruits. In 1970 Towne and colleagues were the first to publish two cases of navicular stress fractures in humans while earlier navicular stress fractures had been reported e.g. in racing dogs. Tarsal navicular stress fractures were thought to be rare overuse injuries. Early studies showed an incidence of 0.7 to 2.4 % in athletes.

 

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Review Article

Isolated Scaphoid Dislocation: Systematic Review of the Literature

De Silva L*, Batty L, MacKay N, Mulford JS

Isolated Scaphoid Dislocation is a dislocation of the Scaphoid with no associated fracture of the scaphoid or other carpal bones [Figure 1]. This is a rare injury that was first described in 1934 by Buzby and has no clear consensus regarding optimal treatment. It is hypothesized that the injury is  caused by violent hyper-flexion and pronation of the wrist. The injury is quite unusual as the forces required to force the scaphoid out of the scaphoid fossa usually results in a fracture through the waist of the scaphoid, rather than an isolated ligamentous injury.

 

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Research Article

Cortical Marrow Ratio in Plain X-rays of Femoral Neck Fractures - Reliability and Relation to BMD

Bjarke Viberg*, Frederik SG Harbo, Jesper RYG, Søren Overgaard, Ole Ovesen, Jens Lauritsen

The failure proportion for surgical treated femoral neck fractures is approximately 35 % in dislocated fractures  and 11 % in undisplaced fractures. Predictors for failure should therefore be investigated and made feasible to implement in clinical practise. One possible predictor for failure of osteosynthesis is osteoporosis. Several experimental studies have shown that low BMD affects the strength of osteosynthesis  and have proposed a limit for high failure risk at 0.4 g/ cm3.

 

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